Archive for insight meditation

Online Dharma opportunity: The Five Hindrances

Posted in Buddhism on the web, Vipassana, Western Buddhism with tags , , , , , , on March 6, 2009 by Al

Audiodharma has added another course to their online meditation curriculum. Ines Freedman and Gil Fronsdal will lead a course on the Five Hindrances starting on May 31. The only prerequisite is that you’ve already completed their Intro to Insight Meditation course with teacher support.

These courses, provided on the basis of dana only, are an amazing wealth of practice support and in depth study. Having a weekly chat with a meditation instructor is a great way to keep your practice going steady through those hot summer months (sloth and torpor, anyone?).

So what are the Five Hindrances, anyway? Sounds like a real downer, right? Yeah, pretty much. The Five Hindrances are those big bad monsters that are likely to keep you frustrated in meditation and that lead you away from enlightenment. Drum roll, please…

1. Sensual desire (kāmacchanda): Craving for pleasure to the senses.
2. Anger or ill-will (byāpāda, vyāpāda): Feelings of malice directed toward others.
3. Sloth-torpor or boredom (thīna-middha): Half-hearted action with little or no concentration.
4. Restlessness-worry (uddhacca-kukkucca): The inability to calm the mind.
5. Doubt (vicikicchā): Lack of conviction or trust.

Source: Wikipedia

As you can imagine, these forces can cause a major motivation suck in plenty of other areas in life besides meditation. I’m hoping this course will touch on when to accept and when to fight back against these hindrances. Coming from a Zen background of goalless goal sitting, sometimes it’s hard to know when to actively suck it up and push back.

If you’ve already taken the Intro course, click here to register. If you just want to audit the course, click here.

Advertisements

The anatomy of an online meditation course

Posted in Buddhism on the web, General, Vipassana with tags , , , , , , on July 17, 2008 by Al

This week, two excellent Insight Meditation teachers kicked off a 6-week Introduction to Mindfulness Meditation Course (that I mentioned in a previous post). What’s special about that, you say? Well, this meditation course takes place entirely online.

Meditation instruction online? Web-based Dharma teachings? Right up my (and probably your) alley. Now that I’ve almost completed Week One of the course and had my first online meeting with my meditation instructor, I thought it would be interesting to profile the tools that Gil Fronsdal and Ines Freedman (along with a host of other assistant teachers they brought on due to the popularity of the course) are using to bring this course to the web.

Site: Google Sites
The teachers have set up a website specifically for the course. Though (almost) all of the information on the site is communicated via email, this provides a nice repository for students to refer back to during the course.

Group communication: Google Groups
All of the communication from the teachers comes via email from a Google account set up specifically for the course. Students were invited to join the Google group as soon as they registered for the course.

Scheduling: Jiffle
This is the one tool I hadn’t heard of before I took this course. Jiffle allows others to schedule themselves for appointment times on your calendar (if you approve the request). Students were required to reserve a time each week on their instructor’s Jiffle calendar for their one on one meeting.

One to one communication: Phone, IM, Skype, and email
Course participants have a lot of flexibility in the way they choose to communicate with their meditation instructors. We had our choice of regular phone (we call our instructor or our instructor calls us), various IM clients (Y! Messenger, AIM, Google Talk), Skype voice and/or text chat, or just plain old emails. No matter what you choose, you get guaranteed weekly live one on one time with your meditation instructor.

The instructors have artfully combined all of these tools to create a seamless practice environment where communication is quick, scheduled, and personal. The instructors are available to answer questions, and practice issues that are relevant to the entire group can easily be shared with everyone. So far, this is a great experience and a flagship example of buddhism for the web generation.